Indian Psychiatric Society

West Bengal State Branch

Welcome to I. P. S., W.B. State Branch

Indian Psychiatric Society, West Bengal State Branch is an association of mental health professionals in West Bengal and is a branch of the parent body, namely Indian Psychiatric Society and our activities shall extend to the state of West bengal under the Eastern Zonal Branch of the Indian Psy...

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Latest News

  • ART EXHIBITION BY THE DOCTOR-ARTISTS

    A novel art exhibition has been organized jointly by the Mirage art gallery authority and International Human Rights Organization at ‘Mirage Art Gallery’, New Alipore, Kolkata. The uniqueness of the exhibitio... Read More

  • Condolence meeting

    Prof Ajita Chakraborty (born 1926), academician and researcher, President of Indian Psychiatric Society (in 1976), Director of Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education & Research, Kolkata,  and the first fem... Read More

  • World Schizophrenia Day 2015

      PSYCHO-EDUCATIVE SEMINAR    ‘Non-drug Approaches in Management of Schizophrenia’   Programme attended by around 70 persons, comprising of students of counseling centers &a... Read More

Events

World Mental Health Day 2014

World Mental Health Day 2014

Schedule: 10/10/2014 to 10/10/2014

World Mental Health Day is observed on 10th of October every year; with the purpose of raising awareness about issues related to mental health and men ...

World Mental Health Day 2014

World Mental Health Day is observed on 10th of October every year; with the purpose of raising awareness about issues related to mental health and mental illnesses and to mobilize efforts in support of mental health. This is an excellent opportunity for all stakeholders working on mental health issues to talk about their work, and what more needs to be done to make mental health care a reality for people worldwide.

The theme for 2014 is “Living with schizophrenia”.  Hence the focus of the World Health Organization will be living a healthy life even with schizophrenia.

The West Bengal branch of Indian Psychiatric Society is holding an interactive panel discussion with family members of persons with Schizophrenia (and some patients themselves), on 10.10.14 evening, from about 6 pm, at the Auditorium of IMA House, Biresh Guha Street, Kolkata - 700017. The panel will include psychiatrists, as well other mental health professionals, like psychologists, psychiatric social workers and psychiatric nurses.  We would like to invite you also to attend this programme, and help spread awareness about mental illnesses. You may also ask caregivers of your patients to come over if they are interested.

 

 

In this regard, I would

 

WMH day celebrations involves discussions between mental health professionals, patients and caregivers of persons with mental illnesses, descriptions of  whatever these individuals are doing, about the huge amount of gap that exists between the reality of   .

The World Health Organisation defines health as “a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely an absence of disease or infirmity”

Firstly it emphasises that mental health is an inseparable part of a person’s holistic well-being, together with physical and social health. This latter point of the indivisibility of body and mind is ancient; mens sana in corpore sano” (healthy mind in a healthy body)

 

In addition to notable elaborations in the literature , recent years have seen the elevation of this

philosophical stance into a campaign, for instance the “No health without mental health.

 

 

The theme for 2014 is “Living with schizophrenia”. The focus of the World Health Organization will be living a healthy life with schizophrenia.

 

Schizophrenia affects around 26 million people across the world and is the focus of World Mental Health Day this year. 

Despite being a treatable disorder, more than 50% of people with schizophrenia cannot access adequate treatment, and 90% of people with untreated schizophrenia live in the developing world.

On 10 October we celebrate the most important day in the mental health calendar and shine the spotlight on "living" with schizophrenia. From those who face every day of their lives with it, to their families, friends, doctors and even society as a whole, we all have a part to play in raising awareness of schizophrenic illness. 

We want to ensure that people with schizophrenia get the best possible care and support to manage their illness and to help them recover. 

What is schizophrenia?

Schizophrenia affects how a person thinks, feels, and acts but it's actually a word that describes a number of symptoms that psychiatry has labelled a disorder. Not everyone with schizophrenia has the same symptoms and the definition of the disorder is wide, including a number of combinations of different things. 

Schizophrenia may make it hard for people to judge reality and key features of early psychosis include: 

  • Sleep disturbance
  • Appetite disturbance
  • Marked unusual behavior
  • Feelings that are flat or seem inconsistent to others
  • Speech that is difficult to follow
  • Marked preoccupation with unusual ideas
  • Ideas of reference – thinking unrelated things have a special meaning, ie people on television talking to you
  • Persistent feelings of unreality
  • Changes in the way things appear, sound or smell.

Schizophrenia can occur in anyone but it's a treatable disorder. Long term medication may be necessary for some people but talking therapies and self-help groups can also be effective. 

How can you celebrate World Mental Health Day?

 

Mental, neurological, and substance use disorders are common in all regions of the world, affecting every community and age group across all income countries. While 14% of the global burden of disease is attributed to these disorders, most of the people affected - 75% in many low-income countries - do not have access to the treatment they need.

The WHO Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) aims at scaling up services for mental, neurological and substance use disorders for countries especially with low- and middle-income. The programme asserts that with proper care, psychosocial assistance and medication, tens of millions could be treated for depression, schizophrenia, and epilepsy, prevented from suicide and begin to lead normal lives– even where resources are scarce.

 

 

Mental health: a state of well-being

Updated August 2014

Mental health is defined as a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.

The positive dimension of mental health is stressed in WHO's definition of health as contained in its constitution: "Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."

This fact file highlights the important aspects of mental health and disorders. The images include pictures drawn by children who participated in the WHO Global School Contest of Mental Health in 2001

 

Seminar

Seminar

Schedule: 20/02/2015 to 20/02/2015

The first academic prgramme of IPSWB in this year was held on the 20th of February 2015, Friday from 7:30 PM, at our premises on the 4th Floor of IMA ...

Seminar

The first academic prgramme of IPSWB in this year was held on the 20th of February 2015, Friday from 7:30 PM, at our premises on the 4th Floor of IMA House, 11/3, Biresh Guha Street, Kolkata – 700 017.

Topic:  Various Interfaces of Schizophrenia & Obsessions’

Speakers: Dr Abir Mukherjee & Dr Sujit Sarkhel

Chairpersons:     Dr Dinen Banerjee, President, IPSWB, & Dr Partha Dutta, Consultant Psychiatrist, Kolkata

The program was attended by about ........... individuals and was followed by dinner. 

World Schizophrenia Day

World Schizophrenia Day

Schedule: 24/05/2015 to 24/05/2015

Awareness Programme: A psycho-educative seminar was held on 24.05.2015, on ‘Non-drug Approaches in Management of Schizophrenia’. The progr ...

World Schizophrenia Day

Awareness Programme: A psycho-educative seminar was held on 24.05.2015, on ‘Non-drug Approaches in Management of Schizophrenia’. The programme was attended by around 70 persons, comprising of students of counseling centers and social work courses, professional care-givers, health workers from organizations, like DANA, Ishwar Sankalpa, Paripurnata, Abha Mission, Ramkrishna Mission Sikhshanamandira, as well as senior  psychiatrists, like Drs Amitabha Mukherjee, Srikumar Mikherjee & Ranjan Bhattacharya.

 

There was also an exhibition of work being done by different organizations in tackling schizophrenia in the community, as well as art works done by sufferers, which highlighted the wonderful extent to which even chronic PWS may improve with proper care and treatment.

 

Proceedings were initiated by the President of IPSWB, Dr. Dinen Banerjee. It was followed by an overview of the illness by Dr. Neelanjana Paul, Secretary, IPSWB, who spoke of fundamental symptoms of Schizophrenia, and also used video-clippings from the film ‘A Beautiful Mind’ based on the life of Nobel Laureate mathematician, John Nash who had suffered from the same illness.

 

Panelist, Mr. Prasanta Roy, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology, IOP, Kolkata shared true stories of patients highlighting the family perspective and need for engaging with the patients. The impact of stigma around the illness was discussed by Mr. Kamlesh Kumar Sahu, Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Social Work, IOP, Kolkata. Ms Protiva Sengupta, psychologist, SEVOK, Kolkata, described the ‘Club-house model of schizophrenia rehabilitation’, which helps patients live with dignity. Ms Sukanya Acharya of Ishwar Sankalpa, Kolkata, shared successful stories of community psychiatry service, restoration and rehabilitation work.

 

Dr Ujjaini Srimani, psychiatrist, emphasized the need to rethink our traditional social values around marriage, reproduction and construction of family as support system that greatly influences the management of PWS. Dr. Gautam Bandyopadhyay, Professor of Psychiatry, North Bengal Medical College, Siliguri, acted as the moderator of the program and gave important inputs on the history of our understanding of schizophrenia, its symptomatology and management.

 

The panel discussion was followed by an interactive session with the participants with intriguing questions and answers. The participants were unanimous in highlighting the need for raising mass awareness, fighting social stigma, ensuring early diagnosis and undertaking an integrated approach of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions.